Hurricane Donald Trump’s Effect on Asia

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Friday, April 8th, 2016
Donald_Trump

Donald Trump (Image source: en.wikipedia.org)

The American political elections are drawing more attention than ever, especially because of one candidate: the Republican Donald Trump, renowned real estate mogul. Recently, after Trump’s astonishing victory in 7 states on Super Tuesday, it seems as if the egotistical candidate and his foreign policies are becoming a reality.

His radical idea of isolationism seems far too déjà-vu and, honestly, faulty. If Trump becomes president, not only will he have a national impact, but he will shake the international world, especially South Korea. Undoubtedly, Trump will sever US-Asia relations because of his isolationist rhetoric.

According to Jeff Kingston, head of Asian studies at Temple University, “President Trump would be a typhoon for U.S. relations in Asia.” If Trump’s proclamations are realized, South Korea can expect the withdrawal of the US military force and the removal of students with birthright citizenship.

Because of South Korea’s belligerent neighbor who threatens to initiate World War III, the United States military has, for decades, combined forces with the South Korean military. Annual war simulations take place and the peace of the region is maintained. However, Trump believes that South Korea is “sponging off” of America and that compensation to the U.S. is not adequately provided. He believes that America should stop “protecting” Korea. In fact, South Korea pays 866.6 million dollars each year for the U.S. presence and nearly 700 million dollars for construction, personnel, and logistics costs.

Furthermore, if Trump severs military cooperation, the global economy will also suffer.
His protectionist trade policies will cut trade between the United States and Korea, not to mention China and Japan. A breakdown of Trump’s statements reveals a tarnished future world. South Korea will be at a standoff with North Korea, and the United States will cocoon itself in a protective shell designed by Donald Trump. Moreover, U.S. exports to South Korea will cease because of Trump’s foreign and economic policies, thus sparking more tension between old allies.

Also, Trump threatens to “weed out” foreign students from America itself. As an extreme opponent to the idea of birthright citizenship and immigration, Donald Trump strives to abolish the 14th Amendment and create a new amendment proclaiming the end of birthright citizenship - something that serves a valuable role for international students. Birthright citizenship is when two foreigners - immigrants - have a baby born in the U.S. thereby allowing the baby to become a U.S. citizen.

Leo Kim

Leo Kim, Taejon Christian International School (TICS)

However, what exactly will the end of birthright citizenship mean for foreign students? Ultimately, ending birthright citizenship would possibly render thousands of would-be citizens country-less, homeless, stateless, and legally lost. The legislation change would leave certain people in an international legal limbo because fetuses or unborn children will be unable to receive citizenship.

Trump’s alternative citizenship idea is to grant citizenship based on lineage in the country. This would leave two options to immigrants: either take the citizenship test or simply taking refuge in another country. The citizenship test is a difficult challenge for immigrants because of the radically different cultural norms and history. Furthermore, if lineage solely determines one’s credibility to be a citizen, it will alter the cornerstone of America’s image as an immigrant-friendly country. Because of America’s prestigious universities, more and more Koreans are heading to the land of the Statue of Liberty to receive education and make a living.

However, these innocent people will be booted out if Trump’s policies are enacted. Furthermore, young Korean toddlers will perceive America negatively because of Trump’s policies, which would prevent them from attending school in America with their parents. The world’s next generations could grow up with different ideals; consequently, the United Nations would have arguing ambassadors with no chance of world reform. Trump’s presidency would spell the doom of international military treaties, relationships, and trade.

Ultimately, for Americans to stop Hurricane Trump, one must analyze Donald’s stance. Is this what I want for my children? Is this what I envision America in 4 years? Is this going to help the world? Therefore, I urge Korean-Americans, the ones who can vote, to vote for another presidential candidate -- one with more traditional and globally beneficial ideals. Your vote can make a difference. Albeit, a four-year term may seem minuscule, it may mark the beginning of a new, insurgent era.

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